Setting Up Cluster Autoscaler In EKS

Unlike GKE, EKS does not come with Cluster Autoscaler. We’ll have to configure it ourselves. We’ll need to add a few tags to the Autoscaling Group dedicated to worker nodes, to put additional permissions to the Role we’re using, and to install Cluster Autoscaler.
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To Replicas Or Not To Replicas In Kubernetes Deployments And StatefulSets?

Knowing that HorizontalPodAutoscaler (HPA) manages auto-scaling of our applications, the question might arise regarding replicas. Should we define them in our Deployments and StatefulSets, or should we rely solely on HPA to manage them? Instead of answering that question directly, we’ll explore different combinations and, based on results, define the strategy.

First, let’s see how many Pods we have in our cluster right now.

You might not be able to use the same commands since they assume that go-demo-5 application is already running, that the cluster has HPA enabled, that you cloned the code, and a few other things. I presented the outputs so that you can follow the logic without running the same commands.

kubectl -n go-demo-5 get pods

The output is as follows.

NAME    READY STATUS  RESTARTS AGE
api-... 1/1   Running 0        27m
api-... 1/1   Running 2        31m
db-0    2/2   Running 0        20m
db-1    2/2   Running 0        20m
db-2    2/2   Running 0        21m

We can see that there are two replicas of the api Deployment, and three replicas of the db StatefulSets.
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Four Phases Of Kubernetes Adoption

Kubernetes is probably the biggest project we know. It is vast, and yet many think that after a few weeks or months of reading and practice they know all there is to know about it. It’s much bigger than that, and it is growing faster than most of us can follow. How far did you get in Kubernetes adoption?

From my experience, there are four main phases in Kubernetes adoption.

In the first phase, we create a cluster and learn intricacies of Kube API and different types of resources (e.g., Pods, Ingress, Deployments, StatefulSets, and so on). Once we are comfortable with the way Kubernetes works, we start deploying and managing our applications. By the end of this phase, we can shout “look at me, I have things running in my production Kubernetes cluster, and nothing blew up!” I explained most of this phase in The DevOps 2.3 Toolkit: Kubernetes.
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Rumblings Of An Old Man

Continuous Deployment is about making a decision to do things right. It is a clear goal and a proof that the changes across all levels were successful. The primary obstacle is thinking that we can get there without drastic changes in the application’s architecture, processes, and culture. Tools are the least of our problems.

I spend a significant chunk of my time helping companies improve their systems. The most challenging part of my job is going back home after an engagement knowing that the next time I visit the same company, I will discover that there was no significant improvement. I cannot say that is not partly my fault. It certainly is. I might not be very good at what I do. Or maybe I am not good at conveying the right message. Maybe my advice was wrong. There can be many reasons for those failures, and I do admit that they are probably mostly my fault. Still, I cannot shake the feeling that my failures are caused by something else. I think that the root cause is in false expectations.
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High-Level Overview Of The Continuous Delivery Pipeline

Let’s paint a high-level picture of the continuous delivery pipeline. To be more precise, we’ll draw a diagram instead of painting anything. But, before we dive into a continuous delivery diagram, we’ll refresh our memory with the one we used before for describing continuous deployment.

The continuous deployment pipeline contains all the steps from pushing a commit to deploying and testing a release in production.

Continuous delivery removes one of the stages from the continuous deployment pipeline. We do NOT want to deploy a new release automatically. Instead, we want humans to decide whether a release should be upgraded in production. If it should, we need to decide when will that happen. Those (human) decisions are, in our case, happening as Git operations. We’ll comment on them soon. For now, the important note is that the deploy stage is now removed from pipelines residing in application repositories.
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Exploring The Continuous Deployment Process

Explaining continuous deployment (CDP) is easy. Implementing it is very hard, and the challenges are often hidden and unexpected. Depending on the maturity of your processes, architecture, and code, you might find out that the real problems do not lie in the code of a continuous deployment pipeline, but everywhere else. As a matter of fact, developing a pipeline is the easiest part.
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How to create a culture of learning and innovation?

Every once in a while I get asked a variation of the same question. “Viktor, how do we create a learning culture in our company?” In most cases, my answer receives a bad reception. The short version of it is to “stop doing what you’re doing, and get out of the way.”

Engineers love learning. Most of us became engineers because we like to “play” with tech. And yet, people in many organizations complain that they are not allowed to innovate and that they don’t have time to learn. If my statement that engineers are playful kind of people, lack of innovation cannot be attributed to them, so we need to look for causes somewhere else.
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