Monthly Archives: February 2019

Creating Custom Jenkins X Build Packs

I stand by my claim that “you do not need to understand Kubernetes to use Jenkins X.” To be more precise, those who do not want to know Kubernetes and its ecosystem in detail can benefit from Jenkins X ability to simplify the processes around software development lifecycle. That’s the promise or, at least, one of the driving ideas behind the project. Nevertheless, for that goal to reach as wide of an audience as possible, we need a variety of build packs. The more we have, the more use cases can be covered with a single jx import or jx quickstart command. The problem is that there is an infinite number of types of applications and combinations we might have. Not all can be covered with community-based packs. No matter how much effort the community puts into creating build packs, they will always be a fraction of what we might need. That’s where you come in.
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Is Your Cluster Ready For Jenkins X?

If you’re reading this, the chances are that you do not want to use jx cluster create to create a new cluster that will host Jenkins X. That is OK, or even welcome. That likely means that you are already experienced with Kubernetes and that you already have applications running in Kubernetes. That’s a sign of maturity and your desire to add Jenkins X to the mix of whichever applications you are already running there. After all, it would be silly to create a new cluster for each set of applications.

However, using an existing Kubernetes cluster is risky. Many people think that they are so smart that they will assemble their Kubernetes cluster from scratch. “We’re so awesome that we don’t need tools like Rancher to create a cluster for us.” “We’ll do it with kubeadm.” Then, after a lot of sweat, we announce that the cluster is operational, only to discover that there is no StorageClass or that networking does not work. So, if you assembled your own cluster and you want to use Jenkins X inside it, you need to ask yourself whether that cluster is set up correctly. Does it have everything we need? Does it comply with standards, or did you tweak it to meet your corporate restrictions? Did you choose to remove StorageClass because all your applications are stateless? Were you forced by your security department to restrict communication between Namespaces? Is the Kubernetes version too old? We can answer those and many other questions by running compliance tests.
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