Category Archives: Jenkins

Implementing ChatOps With Jenkins X

Jenkins X main logic is based on applying GitOps principles. Every change must be recorded in Git, and only Git is allowed to initiate events that result in changes in our clusters. That logic is the cornerstone of Jenkins X, and it served us well so far. However, there are actions we might need to perform that do not result in changes to the source code or configurations. Hence the emergence of ChatOps.

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Is Your Cluster Ready For Jenkins X?

If you're reading this, the chances are that you do not want to use jx cluster create to create a new cluster that will host Jenkins X. That is OK, or even welcome. That likely means that you are already experienced with Kubernetes and that you already have applications running in Kubernetes. That's a sign of maturity and your desire to add Jenkins X to the mix of whichever applications you are already running there. After all, it would be silly to create a new cluster for each set of applications.

However, using an existing Kubernetes cluster is risky. Many people think that they are so smart that they will assemble their Kubernetes cluster from scratch. "We're so awesome that we don't need tools like Rancher to create a cluster for us." "We'll do it with kubeadm." Then, after a lot of sweat, we announce that the cluster is operational, only to discover that there is no StorageClass or that networking does not work. So, if you assembled your own cluster and you want to use Jenkins X inside it, you need to ask yourself whether that cluster is set up correctly. Does it have everything we need? Does it comply with standards, or did you tweak it to meet your corporate restrictions? Did you choose to remove StorageClass because all your applications are stateless? Were you forced by your security department to restrict communication between Namespaces? Is the Kubernetes version too old? We can answer those and many other questions by running compliance tests.
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Deploying Jenkins To A Kubernetes Cluster Using Helm

This article is an excerpt from The DevOps 2.4 Toolkit: Continuous Deployment To Kubernetes. It assumes that you already have a Kubernetes cluster with nginx Ingress. The article was tested with minikube, minishift, Docker for Mac/Windows, AWS with kops, and GKE. Furthermore, I will assume that you already installed Helm. Finally, I expect you to clone vfarcic/k8s-specs and execute the commands from inside it.

First things first... We need to find out the IP of our cluster or external LB if available. The commands that follow will differ from one cluster type to another.
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Automating Jenkins Docker Setup

Jenkins is, by far, the most used CI/CD tool in the market. That comes as no surprise since it's been around for a while, it has one of the biggest open source communities, it has enterprise version for those who need it, and it is straightforward to extend it to suit (almost) anyone's needs.

Products that dominate the market for years tend to be stable and very feature rich. Jenkins is no exception. However, with age come some downsides as well. In the case of Jenkins, automation setup is one of the things that has a lot to be desired. If you need Jenkins to serve as an orchestrator of your automation and tasks, you'll find it to be effortless to use. But, if you need to automate Jenkins itself, you'll realize that it is not as smooth as you'd expect from modern tools. Never the less, Jenkins setup can be automated, and we'll go through one possible solution.
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Blue-Green Deployment To Docker Swarm with Jenkins Workflow Plugin

docker-jenkinsThe idea behind this article is to explore ways to deploy releases with Jenkins to Docker Swarm without downtime. We'll use blue-green procedure. More info about the process and one possible implementation can be found in the Blue-Green Deployment, Automation and Self-Healing Procedure article. One of the downsides of the process we used in that article is Ansible itself. While it is probably the best tool for provisioning and orchestration, it had some downsides when we tried to use it as the tool to deploy containers. This is especially evident when the process is complex. Ansible lacks some constructs common in most programming languages. This time we'll try to implement the same process but using the Jenkins Workflow Plugin that was developed and contributed to Jenkins open source project by CloudBees.
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