Category Archives: Test-driven development

The Test-Driven Java Development book wrote by Alex Garcia and me has just been published by Packt Publishing. It was a long, demanding, but very rewarding journey that resulted in a very comprehensive hands-on material for all Java developers interested in learning or improving their TDD skills.

If you liked my articles on this subject I am sure that you’ll find this book very useful. It contains extensive tutorials, guidelines and exercises for all Java developers eager to learn how to successfully apply TDD practices.

Writing a blog like this requires a lot of time. By purchasing a copy of the book you will not only get a valuable material but also allow me to continue writing new articles. Posts in this blog are only a fraction of what you will find in the book.

You can download a sample or purchase your own copy directly from Packt or Amazon.

Test-Driven Java Development

7429OS_Test-Driven Java DevelopmentI’m happy to announce that the Test-Driven Java Development book wrote by Alex Garcia and me has just been published by Packt Publishing. It was a long, demanding, but very rewarding journey that resulted in a very comprehensive hands-on material for all Java developers interested in learning or improving their TDD skills.

If you liked my articles on this subject I am sure that you’ll find this book very useful. It contains extensive tutorials, guidelines and exercises for all Java developers eager to learn how to successfully apply TDD practices.

Writing a blog like this requires a lot of time. By purchasing a copy of the book you will not only get a valuable material but also allow me to continue writing new articles. Posts in this blog are only a fraction of what you will find in the book.

You can download a sample or purchase your own copy directly from Packt or Amazon.

Developing Front-End Microservices With Polymer Web Components And Test-Driven Development (Part 3/5): The Second Component

In the previous article we finished one Polymer Web Component. It contained a form that could be used to add, update and remove books by sending HTTP requests to the back-end server. We also explored few different ways to interact with the component from outside by calling its functions.

In this article we’ll create the second component that will be used to list all the books and send custom events to open an existing or a new book. Those events will not be sent directly to the component we built earlier but to the document the component will reside on. We’ll get to that part in time…

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Developing Front-End Microservices With Polymer Web Components And Test-Driven Development (Part 2/5): Polishing The First Component

book-form-scIn the previous article we created our first Polymer Web Component using Test-Driven Development approach. While all the specifications we wrote were implemented, there are still few things we should do to polish this component. The tc-book-form currently has the form with all the input fields required by the back-end. It also has buttons to add or update and delete a book. Those buttons are calling iron-ajax Polymer element that sends requests to the back-end. Both front-end (in form of Web Component) and back-end are developed as a single microservice.

The next task in front of us is to polish the component. Later on in this series we’ll create another component that will list all books. We’ll also develop the code that will enable us to establish communication between those two components. Once we’re done with both, we’ll explore ways to integrate the microservices we developed into a separate Web Application.

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Developing Front-End Microservices With Polymer Web Components And Test-Driven Development (Part 1/5): The First Component

In this article series we’ll go through Web Components development in context of microservices. We’ll use Polymer as the library that will help us out. The objective is to create a microservice that will handle full functionality. The service will contain not only back-end API (as is the case with most microservices) but also front-end in form of Web Components. Later on, when the time comes to use the service we’re creating, we’ll simply import Web Components. That is quite a different approach than what you might be used to. We won’t create a Web Application that calls APIs handled by microservices. We’ll import parts of the front-end from microservices. Our objective is to have a microservice that contains everything; from front-end to back-end. Please refer to the Including Front-End Web Components Into Microservices article for more information that lead to this decision.

I am a huge fan of Test-Driven Development so we’ll write all the code using test first approach. We’ll write a test, run all tests and confirm that the last one fails, write implementation, run all tests and confirm that all passed. Tests will act as executable specifications. We’ll use them to define what should be implemented. If you are new to TDD and the concept of executable documentation, please read the article Tests As Documentation.

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Test-Driven Development (TDD)

What is Test-Driven Development (TDD)?

large__8282043567Test-Driven Development is a process that relies on the repetition of very short development cycle. It is based on the test-first concept of Extreme Programming (XP) that encourages simple design with high level of confidence.

The procedure of doing TDD is following:

  1. Write a test
  2. Run all tests
  3. Write the implementation code
  4. Run all tests
  5. Refactor
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Scala Test-Driven Development (TDD): Unit Testing File Operations with Specs2 and Mockito

In this article we’ll go through the exercise of writing a method that will write string content to the specified file. There will be an option to specify whether we should overwrite an existing file. In addition, directories should be created if they do not already exist.

Programming language is Scala and testing framework that will be used is Specs2. In the spirit of unit testing, instead of interactions with the file system we’ll use mocks with Mockito (already included in Specs2). All the code will be done using Test-Driven Development (TDD).

This article is based on an existing code done for the open source application BDD Assistant located in the TechnologyConversationsBdd repository.

Let’s get started.
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Test Driven Development (TDD): Best Practices Using Java Examples

In the previous article Test Driven Development (TDD): Example¬†Walkthrough an example of TDD was given. It went from writing first test and its implementation to having a set of requirements fully tested and developed. Now it’s time to learn what the best TDD practices are. This article will be built on examples from the previous one.

Best practices are solutions to a set of problems under certain situations. Not following them would make us “reinvent the wheel” and struggle with the same problems already solved by others. On the other hand, best practices should not be followed blindly. They should be tried out. With an informed decision at hand, they can be adopted as they are, modified to serve better specific situation or fully discarded.

Some of the best practices described here are inherited from other sets of practices and used when doing TDD. For example, most (if not all) unit testing practices should be used when doing TDD.
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