Tag Archives: CDP

Canary Deployments To Kubernetes Using Istio and Friends: Introduction

The video below is a clip from the "Canary Deployments To Kubernetes Using Istio and Friends" course in Udemy. It provides the introduction to the course we released in December 2019. Additional preview clips are available inside the course. Please use the coupons with discounts provided below.

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Transcript

Welcome to practical guide to canary deployments. Unlike some other work that I did...tutorials, workshops, and so on and so forth, that were very focused on a single tool, this time I will focus more on a process.

We're going to try to figure out how to do canary deployments inside of Kubernetes. Because Kubernetes is everywhere now, I will assume that you are using Kubernetes. But outside of that, we are going to try to figure out which tools to use, but all serving as the process itself, not for the sake of learning a specific tool. And during that process, we are going to decide which tools to use and why to use them and the end result will be a fully operational canary deployments process that you will be able to plug into any CI/CD tool or any tool that orchestrates the lifecycle of your application.

So we will definitely choose some tools that we will use in a process.
And those tools will be revolving around Istio. I will explain why Istio a bit later.

So we will use Kubernetes and Istio for canary deployments, but the end result will be agnostic to the tool that will orchestrate your processes. We will most likely also have to choose one or two additional tools. Which tools we'll choose is yet to be discovered.

For now just think of this as being a practical guide to a specific process. And that process today is canary deployments in Kubernetes.

Canary Deployments To Kubernetes Using Istio: Why Did We Do Such a Course?

Drawing by Sara Farcic

A while ago, we (Viktor Farcic and Darin Pope) thought it would be a good idea to add an out-of-the-box option to use canary deployments in Jenkins X. We should have finished it by now, and yet we did not even start working on it. Instead of just adding it to Jenkins X, we spent considerable time exploring the subject.

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Exploring The Continuous Deployment Process

Explaining continuous deployment (CDP) is easy. Implementing it is very hard, and the challenges are often hidden and unexpected. Depending on the maturity of your processes, architecture, and code, you might find out that the real problems do not lie in the code of a continuous deployment pipeline, but everywhere else. As a matter of fact, developing a pipeline is the easiest part.
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Defining Continuous Deployment Goals

The difference between continuous integration, delivery, and deployment is not in processes, but in the level of confidence we have in them.

The continuous deployment process is relatively easy to explain, even though implementation might get tricky. We'll split our requirements into two groups. We'll start with a discussion about the overall goals that should be applied to the whole process. To be more precise, we'll talk about what I consider non-negotiable requirements.
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The DevOps Toolkit Series Explores Continuous Deployment To Kubernetes

Soon after I started working on The DevOps 2.3 Toolkit: Kubernetes, I realized that a single book could only scratch the surface. Kubernetes is vast, and no single book can envelop even all the core components. If we add community projects, the scope becomes even more extensive. Then we need to include hosting vendors and different ways to set up and manage Kubernetes. That would inevitably lead us to third-party solutions like OpenShift, Rancher, and DockerEE, to name a few. It doesn't end there. We'd need to explore other types of community and third-party additions like those related to networking and storage. And don't forget the processes like, for example, continuous delivery and deployment. All those things could not be explored in a single book so The DevOps 2.3 Toolkit: Kubernetes ended up being an introduction to Kubernetes. It can serve as the base for exploring everything else.

The moment I published the last chapter of The DevOps 2.3 Toolkit: Kubernetes, I started working on the next material. A lot of ideas and tryouts came out of it. It took me a while until the subject and the form of the forthcoming book materialized. After a lot of consultation with the readers of the previous book, the decision was made to explore continuous delivery and deployment processes in a Kubernetes cluster. The high-level scope of the book you are reading right now was born.
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