Tag Archives: CI

Tekton vs. Argo Workflows – Kubernetes-Native CI/CD Pipelines

Which self-managed kubernetes-native CI/CD pipeline is the best choice? Is it Tekton or Argo Workflows? Which one should you pick?

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Running Jenkins In Kubernetes – Tutorial And Review

Should we be using Jenkins for our Kubernetes CI/CD pipeline needs in 2021? How to deploy Jenkins in k8s? How to run Jenkins builds in Kubernetes? How would a full CI/CD pipeline look like?

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Tekton – Kubernetes Cloud-Native CI/CD Pipelines And Workflows

Tekton is a powerful and flexible open-source framework for creating CI/CD systems aiming at becoming a de-facto standard for running pipelines and workflows in Kubernetes. It allows developers to build, test, and deploy across cloud providers and on-premise systems.

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Continuous integration, delivery, deployment, and testing explained

Chat is continuous integration (CI), continuous delivery (CD), continuous deployment (CDP), and continuous testing (CT)? How do they differ from each other? Which one should we use?

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Automation of Everything – How To Combine Argo Events, Workflows & Pipelines, CD, and Rollouts

What do we get if we combine events, workflows, GitOps, progressive delivery, and secrets management? The short answer is that we get automation of everything in Kubernetes in a way that we should be operating in 2021.

We’ll combine Argo Events, Workflows & Pipelines, CD, and Rollouts and sprinkle all that with SealedSecrets, Kaniko, and a few other tools.

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Argo Workflows and Pipelines – CI/CD, Machine Learning, and Other Kubernetes Workflows

Argo Workflows & Pipelines is an open source container-native workflow engine for orchestrating parallel jobs on Kubernetes. It is a cloud-native solution designed from ground-up for Kubernetes.

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Continuous Delivery (CD) Is Not What Some Are Trying To Sell You

Since the increase in popularity of continuous delivery (CD), there was an increase in the number of tools marketed as CD solutions. That’s normal. It is only natural for software vendors to ride the waves. They need to sell, and there’s nothing better to sell than whatever is popular at a given moment. Continuous delivery is one of those "popular" waves.

A video version of the same post is available in The DevOps Toolkit Series YouTube channel.

On the surface, there is nothing wrong with buying tools that solve problems. You have a problem, a vendor has a solution, you buy it, they earn money, and you have a good return on investment. Everybody wins, except when the tool does not do what it’s supposed to do. That’s when we run into issues.

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“The DevOps 2.6 Toolkit: Jenkins X” is out

After nine months of work, I managed to finish the latest book in The DevOps Toolkit Series. We’re at the seventh book, and this time it’s all about Jenkins X.

The book is called The DevOps 2.6 Toolkit: Jenkins X and the following few paragraphs is how it starts.

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The Ten Commandments Of Continuous Delivery

The Ten Commandments Of Continuous Delivery

Everyone wants to implement continuous delivery. After all, the benefits are too big to be ignored. Increase the speed of delivery, increase the quality, decrease the costs, free people to dedicate time on what brings value, and so on and so forth. Those improvements are like music to any decision maker. Especially if that person has a business background. If a tech geek can articulate the benefits continuous delivery brings to the table, when he asks a business representative for a budget, the response is almost always “Yes! Do it.”

A continuous delivery project will start. Tests will be written. Builds will be scripted. Deployments will be automated. Everything will be tied into an automated pipeline and triggered on every commit. Everyone will enter a state of nirvana as soon as all that is done. There will be a huge inauguration party with a vice president having the honor to be the first one to press the button that will deploy the first release to production. Isn’t that a glorious plan everyone should be proud of?
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The DevOps Toolkit Series Are Born

The DevOps 2.1 ToolkitAt the beginning of 2016, I published The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit. It took me a long time to finish it. Much longer than I imagined.

I started by writing blog posts in TechnologyConversations.com. They become popular and I received a lot of feedback. Through them, I clarified the idea behind the book. The goal was to provide a guide for those who want to implement DevOps practices and tools. At the same time, I did not want to write a material usable to any situation. I wanted to concentrate only on people that truly want to implement the latest and greatest practices. I hoped to make it go beyond the “traditional” DevOps. I wished to show that the DevOps movement matured and evolved over the years and that we needed a new name. A reset from the way DevOps is implemented in some organizations. Hence the name, The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit.
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