Tag Archives: Docker Compose

Using Docker Stack And Compose YAML Files To Deploy Swarm Services

Bells are ringing! Docker v1.13 is out!

The most common question I receive during my Docker-related talks and workshops is usually related to Swarm and Compose.

Someone: How can I use Docker Compose with Docker Swarm?

Me: You can’t! You can convert your Compose files into a Bundle that does not support all Swarm features. If you want to use Swarm to its fullest, be prepared for docker service create commands that contain a never ending list of arguments.
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Docker Flow – Walkthrough

Docker Flow is a project aimed towards creating an easy to use continuous deployment flow. It depends on Docker Engine, Docker Compose, Consul, and Registrator. Each of those tools is proven to bring value and are recommended for any Docker deployment.

The goal of the project is to add features and processes that are currently missing inside the Docker ecosystem. The project, at the moment, solves the problems of blue-green deployments, relative scaling, and proxy service discovery and reconfiguration. Many additional features will be added soon.

The current list of features is as follows.

Docker Flow: Proxy – On-Demand HAProxy Service Discovery and Reconfiguration

A lot changed since I published that article. The Swarm as a standalone container is deprecated in favor of Swarm Mode bundled inside Docker Engine 1.12+. On the other hand, the Docker Flow: Proxy advanced and became more feature rich and advanced. I suggest you check out the project README instead this article.

The goal of the Docker Flow: Proxy project is to provide a simple way to reconfigure proxy every time a new service is deployed or when a service is scaled. It does not try to “reinvent the wheel”, but to leverage the existing leaders and combine them through an easy to use integration. It uses HAProxy as a proxy and Consul as service registry. On top of those two, it adds custom logic that allows on-demand reconfiguration of the proxy.
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The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit

Today is an exciting day for me. I just decided that the book I spent the last eight months writing is ready for general public.

What made me write the book? Certainly not the promise of wealth since, as any author of technical books will confirm, there is no money that can compensate the number of hours involved in writing a technical book. The reasons behind this endeavor are of a different nature. I realized that this blog is a great way for me to explore different subjects and share my experience with the community. However, due to the format, blog posts do not give enough space to explore, in more details, subjects I’m passionate about so, around eight months ago, I decided to start working on The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit: Automating the Continuous Deployment Pipeline with Containerized Microservices book. It treats similar subjects as those I write about in this blog, but with much more details. More importantly, the book allowed me to organize my experience into a much more coherent story.

The book is about different techniques that help us architect software in a better and more efficient way with microservices packed as immutable containers, tested and deployed continuously to servers that are automatically provisioned with configuration management tools. It’s about fast, reliable and continuous deployments with zero-downtime and ability to roll-back. It’s about scaling to any number of servers, designing self-healing systems capable of recuperation from both hardware and software failures and about centralized logging and monitoring of the cluster.

In other words, this book envelops the whole microservices development and deployment lifecycle using some of the latest and greatest practices and tools. We’ll use Docker, Kubernetes, Ansible, Ubuntu, Docker Swarm and Docker Compose, Consul, etcd, Registrator, confd, Jenkins, and so on. We’ll go through many practices and, even more, tools.

At this moment, around 70% is finished and you’ll receive regular updates if you decide to purchase the book. The truth is that my motivation for writing the book is the same as with this blog. I like sharing my experience and this book is one more way to accomplish that. You can set your own price and if you feel that the minimum amount is still too high, please send me a private message and I’ll get back to you with a free copy.

Please give The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit: Automating the Continuous Deployment Pipeline with Containerized Microservices a try and let me know what you think. Any feedback is welcome and appreciated.

Blue-Green Deployment To Docker Swarm with Jenkins Workflow Plugin

docker-jenkinsThe idea behind this article is to explore ways to deploy releases with Jenkins to Docker Swarm without downtime. We’ll use blue-green procedure. More info about the process and one possible implementation can be found in the Blue-Green Deployment, Automation and Self-Healing Procedure article. One of the downsides of the process we used in that article is Ansible itself. While it is probably the best tool for provisioning and orchestration, it had some downsides when we tried to use it as the tool to deploy containers. This is especially evident when the process is complex. Ansible lacks some constructs common in most programming languages. This time we’ll try to implement the same process but using the Jenkins Workflow Plugin that was developed and contributed to Jenkins open source project by CloudBees.
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Deploying Containers with Docker Swarm and Docker Networking

The purpose of this article is to explore new Docker networking features introduced in version 1.9. We’ll apply them to a Docker Swarm cluster. For practice purposes we’ll be deploying containers to a Swarm cluster created locally with Vagrant and running Consul as a service registry and Registrator as a tool that will monitor Docker daemons and register/de-register containers we run/stop. When combined, Consul and Registrator will act as service discovery within our cluster. I won’t go into details how Docker Swarm or service discovery works. You can find more information about those subject in the following articles.

We’ll skip straight into Docker networking features used within a Swarm cluster.
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Docker Clustering Tools Compared: Kubernetes vs Docker Swarm

Kubernetes and Docker Swarm are probably two most commonly used tools to deploy containers inside a cluster. Both are created as helper tools that can be used to manage a cluster of containers and treat all servers as a single unit. However, they differ greatly in their approach.
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