Tag Archives: Gradle

Continuous Delivery: Code Coverage

This article is part of the Continuous Integration, Delivery and Deployment series.

In the previous article we explored unit tests as the first and fastest set of tests we should run. Now it’s time to see whether our unit tests provide enough code coverage.

Code Coverage

Unit tests by themselves do not provide enough confidence unless we know that they cover significant code coverage. Having all tests successful while, for example, covering only 15% of the code cannot provide enough trust.

Mature teams might not need to measure code coverage. They might know from experience that their unit tests are covering as much code as the project they’re working on needs. Teams like that tend to have years of practice with Test-driven development (TDD). However, for the majority of us, tools that measure the coverage are very indeed useful addition to our tool-belt.
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Continuous Delivery: Unit Tests

This article is part of the Continuous Integration, Delivery and Deployment series.

In the previous article we explored static analysis as one of the first steps in Continuous Delivery. Our journey will continue with unit tests.

Unit Tests

tddBestPracticesAllTestsPassUnit tests are probably the most important part of Continuous Delivery. While unit tests cannot substitute integration and functional tests, they are very easy to write and should be very fast to execute. As any other type of tests, each unit test should be independent of each other. What differentiates unit from other types of tests (integration, functional) is the scope. Each unit test should verify only a single unit of code (method, class, etc). Main benefit of unit tests are that they can find problems early due to their speed of execution. When ease of writing is combined with very short execution time it is no wonder that unit test often represent biggest part of automated tests.
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Application Development: Back-End Solution With Java

In this article we’ll develop a back-end solution that can be used with any front-end (Web, mobiles…). In the next article we’ll extend on this example and work on the front-end using AngularJS, JQuery and Bootstrap CSS.

The goal of the application is to be able to administer books. In particular, we’ll develop the back-end solution for that application that should be able to:

  • Add new book
  • Update existing book
  • Delete an existing book
  • List all books
  • Display details of the selected book
  • Delete all books
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