Tag Archives: Vagrant

The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit

Today is an exciting day for me. I just decided that the book I spent the last eight months writing is ready for general public.

What made me write the book? Certainly not the promise of wealth since, as any author of technical books will confirm, there is no money that can compensate the number of hours involved in writing a technical book. The reasons behind this endeavor are of a different nature. I realized that this blog is a great way for me to explore different subjects and share my experience with the community. However, due to the format, blog posts do not give enough space to explore, in more details, subjects I’m passionate about so, around eight months ago, I decided to start working on The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit: Automating the Continuous Deployment Pipeline with Containerized Microservices book. It treats similar subjects as those I write about in this blog, but with much more details. More importantly, the book allowed me to organize my experience into a much more coherent story.

The book is about different techniques that help us architect software in a better and more efficient way with microservices packed as immutable containers, tested and deployed continuously to servers that are automatically provisioned with configuration management tools. It’s about fast, reliable and continuous deployments with zero-downtime and ability to roll-back. It’s about scaling to any number of servers, designing self-healing systems capable of recuperation from both hardware and software failures and about centralized logging and monitoring of the cluster.

In other words, this book envelops the whole microservices development and deployment lifecycle using some of the latest and greatest practices and tools. We’ll use Docker, Kubernetes, Ansible, Ubuntu, Docker Swarm and Docker Compose, Consul, etcd, Registrator, confd, Jenkins, and so on. We’ll go through many practices and, even more, tools.

At this moment, around 70% is finished and you’ll receive regular updates if you decide to purchase the book. The truth is that my motivation for writing the book is the same as with this blog. I like sharing my experience and this book is one more way to accomplish that. You can set your own price and if you feel that the minimum amount is still too high, please send me a private message and I’ll get back to you with a free copy.

Please give The DevOps 2.0 Toolkit: Automating the Continuous Deployment Pipeline with Containerized Microservices a try and let me know what you think. Any feedback is welcome and appreciated.

Advertisements

Running Linux VMs on Windows

If you are using Windows, please make sure that Git is configured to use “Checkout as-is”. This can be accomplished during the setup by selecting the second or third option from the screen depicted below. Also, if you do not have SSH installed, please make sure that [PATH_TO_GIT]\bin is added to your PATH.
Continue reading

Scaling To Infinity with Docker Swarm, Docker Compose and Consul (Part 4/4) – Scaling Individual Services

This article should be considered deprecated since it speaks about the old (standalone) Swarm. To get more up-to-date information about the new Swarm mode, please read the Docker Swarm Introduction (Tour Around Docker 1.12 Series) article or consider getting the The DevOps 2.1 Toolkit: Docker Swarm book.

This series is split into following articles.

In the previous article we switched from manual to automatic deployment with Jenkins and Ansible. In the quest for zero-downtime we employed Consul to check health of our services and, if one of them fails, initiate deployment through Jenkins.

In this article we’ll explore how to scale individual services.

Continue reading

Scaling To Infinity with Docker Swarm, Docker Compose and Consul (Part 3/4) – Blue-Green Deployment, Automation and Self-Healing Procedure

This article should be considered deprecated since it speaks about the old (standalone) Swarm. To get more up-to-date information about the new Swarm mode, please read the Docker Swarm Introduction (Tour Around Docker 1.12 Series) article or consider getting the The DevOps 2.1 Toolkit: Docker Swarm book.

This series is split into following articles.

In the previous article we manually deployed the first version of our service together with a separate instance of the Mongo DB container. Both are (probably) running on different servers. Docker Swarm decided where to run our containers and Consul stored information about service IPs and ports as well as other useful information. That data was used to link one service with another as well as to provide information nginx needed to create proxy.

We’ll continue where we left and deploy a second version of our service. Since we’re practicing blue/green deployment, the first version was called blue and the next one will be green. This time there will be some additional complications. Deploying the second time is a bit more complicated since there are additional things to consider, especially since our goal is to have no downtime.

Continue reading

Scaling To Infinity with Docker Swarm, Docker Compose and Consul (Part 2/4) – Manually Deploying Services

This article should be considered deprecated since it speaks about the old (standalone) Swarm. To get more up-to-date information about the new Swarm mode, please read the Docker Swarm Introduction (Tour Around Docker 1.12 Series) article or consider getting the The DevOps 2.1 Toolkit: Docker Swarm book.

This series is split into following articles.

The previous article showed how scaling across the server farm looks like. We’ll continue where we left and explore details behind the presented implementation. Orchestration has been done through Ansible. Besides details behind tasks in Ansible playbooks, we’ll see how the same result could be accomplished using manual commands in case you might prefer a different orchestration/deployment framework.

Continue reading

Scaling To Infinity with Docker Swarm, Docker Compose and Consul (Part 1/4) – A Taste of What Is To Come

This article should be considered deprecated since it speaks about the old (standalone) Swarm. To get more up-to-date information about the new Swarm mode, please read the Docker Swarm Introduction (Tour Around Docker 1.12 Series) article or consider getting the The DevOps 2.1 Toolkit: Docker Swarm book.

This series is split into following articles.

Previous articles put a lot a focus on Continuous Delivery and Containers with Docker. In Continuous Integration, Delivery or Deployment with Jenkins, Docker and Ansible I explained how to continuously build, test and deploy micro services packaged into containers and do that across multiple servers, without downtime and with the ability to rollback. We used Ansible, Docker, Jenkins and few other tools to accomplish that goal.

Now it’s time to extend what we did in previous articles and scale services across any number of servers. We’ll treat all servers as one server farm and deploy containers not to predefined locations but to those that have the least number of containers running. Instead of thinking about each server as an individual place where we deploy, we’ll treat all of them as one unit.

Continue reading

Continuous Integration, Delivery or Deployment with Jenkins, Docker and Ansible

This article tries to provide one possible way to set up the Continuous Integration, Delivery or Deployment pipeline. We’ll use Jenkins, Docker, Ansible and Vagrant to set up two servers. One will be used as a Jenkins server and the other one as an imitation of production servers. First one will checkout, test and build applications while perform deployment and post-deployment tests.
Continue reading